Pulmonary Fibrosis Columnist Shares Her Tips for Coping With Tough Days

Life can be extremely difficult when you’re coping with a chronic lung disease like pulmonary fibrosis (PF). As well as dealing with the physical effects of the disease, you also have to cope with the emotional fallout that comes from living with PF.

MORE: The realities of a pulmonary fibrosis diagnosis

Many PF patients will come up with strategies to help them through their worst times. This may involve leaning more on their family and loved ones, turning to their faith for comfort, being mindful and connecting with nature, or trying to think about all of the positive things they have going for them in life.

Our resident columnist, Charlene Marshall, has her own way of dealing with the tough days: She takes time to be mindful of the things she has to be thankful for, like living close to one of the country’s top pulmonary hospitals or having a better lung function than many other PF sufferers.

Counseling can help many people who are struggling emotionally with their pulmonary fibrosis, as can support groups. If you can’t attend a local support group then search out online support groups such as forums and Facebook pages to connect with people who are going through the same things you are. Speaking to others who can truly empathize and offer emotional and practical support can often help you through those dark days.

MORE: How to find support for pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary Fibrosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

One comment

  1. Gary Ford says:

    A couple of things I learned to live by:
    (1) Know your limits and play within it…and truly live it!…for example if your wife has planned three activities but you know you can only manage two, then tell her what you can or can’t do – they do understand but don’t know how you are feeling…
    (2) Maybe, just maybe, you were meant to “learn” and “teach others” about this disease…as Pastor Rick Warren says “God will not waste any experience.” so get out there and spread the word about IPF and educate, educate and educate some more about it..then get them to sign up to #Beadonor…

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