Pulmonary Fibrosis Complicates Small Tasks

Pulmonary Fibrosis Complicates Small Tasks
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When thinking of chronic lung conditions, you may visualize the use of supplemental oxygen or a person struggling with physically demanding tasks, such as walking up a flight of stairs.

People living with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) often struggle with daily tasks. As our disease progresses, our ability to exchange oxygen is limited, causing significant dyspnea or breathlessness. Before my IPF diagnosis, I didn’t know how scary it was to feel short of breath.

I never feel as though I can adequately reflect the experience of IPF, no matter how hard I try to capture the feeling. People ask me if IPF is similar to having a cold when congestion prevents you from breathing easily. My answer is no because congestion typically occurs in the sinus cavities. I occasionally struggle with sinus infections because of a compromised immune system, but I can breathe through my nose despite having low lung function.

People also ask if the effects of IPF are similar to bronchitis. In bronchitis, breathing is accompanied by wheezing or sharp, acute chest pain after physical activity. Bronchitis is closer to my experience of IPF, but it’s still not the same. My chest pain is dull and achy as opposed to sharp. IPF is a chronic rather than acute illness, and it’s something I deal with every day. The muscles in my chest are usually sore from coughing. Additionally, I do not have the mental reassurance that my symptoms will subside and provide me with some relief.

It’s easy to understand why IPF limits physical activity, considering the physiological effects of low blood oxygen levels, fatigue, and shortness of breath. Activities such as climbing stairs, walking rapidly, showering, or carrying heavy items are difficult. What I wanted to highlight in this column are the simple tasks that are difficult for people with IPF that healthy people might take for granted.

Brushing my teeth

To my surprise, brushing my teeth has become more difficult than I could have imagined. Bending over the sink is nearly impossible because of breathlessness and dizziness. I stand up straight while brushing my teeth and only briefly lean over the sink. I also have to focus on my breathing. The toothbrush makes it difficult to breathe through my mouth so I try to breathe through my nose while brushing my teeth.

Drying my hair

I once heard that going to bed with wet hair is unhealthy. Fungal infections can develop because of the moisture trapped between your scalp and the pillow. I try to blow-dry my hair after an evening shower, but keeping my arms above my head leaves me breathless.

Putting on shoes

You’ve probably experienced the head rush that comes from bending over too long to put on your shoes. IPF patients experience this head rush daily due to a lack of oxygen. When I bend over, I can only put one shoe on at a time and need to be sitting down to avoid dizziness, nausea, or flashes in my vision. I often have to ask for help if the shoes require tying or are hard to get on.

Cooking

The physical task of cooking isn’t as challenging as the mental awareness necessary to ensure my safety. Supplemental oxygen and stoves are not a good mix, and leaning over a steaming dish with a plastic cannula can cause it to melt.

What easy tasks have become more difficult for you because of IPF? Let me know in the comments below!

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Note: Pulmonary Fibrosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Pulmonary Fibrosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to pulmonary fibrosis.

Thanks for stopping by my column! My name is Charlene Marshall and I was diagnosed officially with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) on April 7 2016 after 13 months of various tests, hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, such as bronchitis and asthma. Due to my age, the specialist disclosed that he was unsure how the IPF would manifest itself in terms of progression, and whether it would be fast or slow and what the course of my illness might look like. Not much has changed since then, meaning there is still a lot that remains unknown, which is largely due to my age and how “rare” it is for someone under 30 to receive a diagnosis of IPF. That being said, a lot has changed for me in the time since diagnosis and I am looking forward to sharing some of those changes with you through this online platform, and I invite you along for the ride! Throughout this column I intend to chronicle the experience of living with an invisible, yet fatal disease as a young adult and share some stories about how IPF has impacted every aspect of my life, both good and bad, thus far. I plan on highlighting the challenges (and where I can, the positives…) that come with living with IPF and the impact on social and intimate relationships, finances, family dynamics, facing mortality, infertility, travelling, medication side effects, career goals and so much more as it arises for me as a “new” patient. I hope others’ with similar experiences will reach out as no story trumps any other, nor should any go unheard. For now, let me leave you with some personal details about who I am, outside of my IPF diagnosis. I grew up in a small town in south-western Ontario and still live within Ontario, although in a much bigger city. My favorite sport is/was underwater hockey (yes, it is a thing: look it up on YouTube), I love working with people, I work full-time in the Social Work/Social Services field, I am an avid learner filled with heaps of curiosity for the world, which lead me to start my Masters Degree in 2014. I am in the last few months of my Masters Degree and am looking forward to an upcoming trip to Australia more than I’ve looked forward to anything before. Welcome to the shambles and chaos that is my life!
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Thanks for stopping by my column! My name is Charlene Marshall and I was diagnosed officially with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) on April 7 2016 after 13 months of various tests, hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, such as bronchitis and asthma. Due to my age, the specialist disclosed that he was unsure how the IPF would manifest itself in terms of progression, and whether it would be fast or slow and what the course of my illness might look like. Not much has changed since then, meaning there is still a lot that remains unknown, which is largely due to my age and how “rare” it is for someone under 30 to receive a diagnosis of IPF. That being said, a lot has changed for me in the time since diagnosis and I am looking forward to sharing some of those changes with you through this online platform, and I invite you along for the ride! Throughout this column I intend to chronicle the experience of living with an invisible, yet fatal disease as a young adult and share some stories about how IPF has impacted every aspect of my life, both good and bad, thus far. I plan on highlighting the challenges (and where I can, the positives…) that come with living with IPF and the impact on social and intimate relationships, finances, family dynamics, facing mortality, infertility, travelling, medication side effects, career goals and so much more as it arises for me as a “new” patient. I hope others’ with similar experiences will reach out as no story trumps any other, nor should any go unheard. For now, let me leave you with some personal details about who I am, outside of my IPF diagnosis. I grew up in a small town in south-western Ontario and still live within Ontario, although in a much bigger city. My favorite sport is/was underwater hockey (yes, it is a thing: look it up on YouTube), I love working with people, I work full-time in the Social Work/Social Services field, I am an avid learner filled with heaps of curiosity for the world, which lead me to start my Masters Degree in 2014. I am in the last few months of my Masters Degree and am looking forward to an upcoming trip to Australia more than I’ve looked forward to anything before. Welcome to the shambles and chaos that is my life!
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4 comments

  1. Marice Purser says:

    Thank you so much for sharing your life experiences. I am 74 and was diagnosed in 2012 when aged 66. Recently my Specialist told me that I am 1 in only 5% with IPF who is doing well. My current oxygen level is 57% and it now seems to reduce by 7% per annum. I do put this down to trying hard to stay in good shape by doing hydrotherapy exercises twice per week, along with watching my weight and appreciating a fit husband. I also take Zinc tablets, which strengthens the immune system twice per week, and when traveling we take daily, and so far have not had any probs. I also take Swisse Lung Health Support daily. Another item to share is that I love music, and when listening I whistle the tune which seems to loosen the lung congestion, and I can cough it up. This then means deeper breathing, which is my aim, to take as many deep breaths as possible, for the rest of my lucky life.

    • Charlene Marshall says:

      Hi Marice,

      Thank you so much for reading my columns and reaching out via the comments. It is such a privilege to connect with others, and I really appreciate your kind words. So glad to hear that news from the specialist — keep doing as well as you can with IPF, as it certainly can be a cruel condition. I’ll keep my fingers crossed that it stays this way for a long time, and thanks for sharing the different strategies you use to stay well. Undoubtedly this will help others! I so appreciate hearing your story, best wishes to you Marice.
      Kind regards,
      Charlene.

  2. Marice Purser says:

    There is something that I forgot to mention yesterday and that is, I have a special stool that I can put my foot up onto when putting on shoes. This way, means that I do not need to bend so far over to close the shoe when required, which means that I do not lose my breath so easily. Hopefully this might be a clue for our IPF Friends. By the way, I am in Western Australia and am a lifetime member of the Australian American Association WA, if anyone comes to Perth, please let’s know,

    • Charlene Marshall says:

      Hi Marice,

      Thank you so much for sharing this tip — a stool is a great idea, as it allows us patients with IPF having to bend less which really makes me short of breath and dizzy. Another patient mentioned the benefit of a shoe horn as well, both really good ideas! Thanks for circling back and adding this information for us.

      I love Australia — I spent time in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney over the years and hope to add Perth to the list soon. It is quite a distance from Canada but I’d love to get back down this year. If I can make it there, I’d love to say hello 🙂
      Charlene.

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