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    • #30881
      Christie Patient
      Moderator

      After two years in this pandemic, we all know that chronically ill and immunocompromised people are at higher risk of contracting and suffering severe illness from COVID-19. Vaccinations are our best weapon against the virus that causes COVID, but people on immune suppressants, especially transplant recipients, are less likely to develop antibodies from the vaccine. Recently, a monoclonal antibody combination therapy has been authorized for emergency use in the US. EvuSheld is a muscular injection therapy given every six months that helps people with limited immune systems fight the virus. “For those who don’t respond well to vaccines, Evusheld shots put COVID-fighting proteins directly into their bodies.” (NPR)

      This is a great step forward in protecting our immunocompromised communities, but the problem is that there is such a limited supply of EvuSheld, that not everyone who could benefit from it can access it. Many hospitals–including UCSF where my mom’s transplant care is based–are resorting to a lottery system to allocate doses among their immunocompromised patient population. Her team asked my mom to take an antibody test to see if she had any immune response from her three-dose series of Moderna vaccinations. She was negative for both IgG and IgM antibodies. After that, they entered her name into the lottery to see if she would be a lucky one to receive EvuSheld therapy at this time.

      With 7 million people in the US who could benefit from this treatment, it is frustrating that only 400,000 doses have been shipped to providers. The community that has been waiting under the biggest burden of pandemic stress will have to wait a bit longer for relief, I’m afraid.

      Have you heard of EvuSheld? Is it available where you live? Are you in touch with your medical team about getting on the waiting list (or in the lottery) to receive this therapy? Let us know your experience!

    • #30934
      David Ota
      Participant

      Christie

      I have heard of EvuSheld.  My wife mentioned it before we went to Clinic a couple of weeks ago.  I asked the Doc about it or getting a script for Paxlovid.  She said the hospital did not have EvuSheld and was essentially saving Paxlovid for those patients who really needed it.  At my last photopheresis visit, I heard the Hospital was setting up a program to distribute the small amount of EvuSheld they had received.  When I asked my Transplant Coordinator about that, she said they were limiting the EvuSheld to the new Transplantees, less than 1 year from their operation.  That makes sense to me.  I told my coordinator I knew a good looking transplantee that would be willing to take the EvuSheld if the had any Anti-Evu’s on their list. 🙂

      • #30942
        Christie Patient
        Moderator

        @davidota Interesting how different their approach is to UCSF and others who are running a lottery for it. The lotteries are tiered by risk level to prioritize those with the highest risk, but honestly, I think it makes more sense to just go ahead and administer it to the most vulnerable first without making a big fuss of it. I’m sure they’ll start making calls when more is available. Here’s hoping that will be soon!!

    • #31051
      Samuel Kirton
      Participant

      Hello all, I need to disclose first that I have received the Evusheld infusion on Jan 12th. This was six-months post-transplant for me. The infusion was a non-event but did require a one-hour wait following the infusion.
      My care team lobbied their hospital to allocate their Evusheld allotment to lung transplant patients first. One other center nearby did establish a lottery, while another prioritized solid organ transplant (SOT) patients.
      Oddly enough, there is specific guidance from NIH on the prioritization of Evusheld recipients at the NIH website. You have to scroll down to “Patient Prioritization for Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis” and click-through links in the article to connect the dots of their recommendation. The bottom line, SOT patients who are being immunosuppressed and otherwise meet the criteria for the infusion need it!

      • #31054
        Christie Patient
        Moderator

        Great information Sam, thanks! I think based on that guideline, hospitals should be prioritizing SOT patients ahead of other immunosuppressed people as the supply of EvuSheld becomes more widely available. Until then, they’ll just have to do their best to get as many high-risk people treated as they can. 🙂

        Did you notice any side effects from your infusion?

        • #31079
          Samuel Kirton
          Participant

          Hi Christie,

          I noticed no side effects at all. The infusion was given via two injections between the buttocks and beltline.  There was no redness, swelling, or discomfort in my case.

           

        • #31121
          Jenny Burwell
          Participant

          Hi Sam, Thank you for the info.  I have a few more questions.  Would you be able after receiving the injections to drive yourself  a two hour trip?  Also, I am very afraid of needles.  Hard to believe after all I have been through but I am.  Do the injections hurt as they are being administered?  I’m sort of confused how they infuse the medication via injections.

           

           

        • #31122
          Samuel Kirton
          Participant

          Hi Jenny,

          I am glad to answer these from my experience/understanding.

          I was able to drive myself after the appointment. Depending on traffic I also live ninety minutes – two hours away from my care center. I had no adverse effects from the Evusheld.

          The injections did not hurt at all.  They were administered in the area just below the waist and above the buttocks.

          As for the use of the term infusion, it is my understanding that is because there are two different medications administered together. They will join forces to create the protection barrier offered by Evusheld.

          Sam …

      • #31124
        Jenny Burwell
        Participant

        Sam – thank you so much for info.

    • #31227
      Samuel Kirton
      Participant

      Just by way of an update, here in the US, the FDA issued a change to Evusheld dosage, essentially doubling each part of the infusion from 150 mg to 300 mg each.  I have been scheduled for the up-dosing this Sunday (3/6).  More information on the change can be found here.

      Sam …

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