How My Sense of Purpose Has Evolved with Pulmonary Fibrosis

How My Sense of Purpose Has Evolved with Pulmonary Fibrosis

younger than 30

Arguably, one of the most soul-searching questions someone can ask is, “What is my purpose in this life?”

The answer to that question isn’t always easy and it likely changes as we grow and develop. When a life-threatening illness like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is added to the mix, the answer becomes even more complicated. My desire to answer that question has intensified since I first received my diagnosis.

While pursuing a post-secondary education, I knew what type of career I wanted. I hadn’t sorted out the exact details, but I knew the basics: I desired to work with children in a helping profession. This narrowed down my career choices until I settled on one to pursue. After a lot of hard work and prioritization of my career over personal relationships, I persevered and landed my desired career, which came with a good salary, paid vacation, and benefits. I thought this was all I needed to be satisfied since it’s what I had worked years for.

Following my IPF diagnosis in 2016, I lost my sense of purpose for a while. My mental health wasn’t good, I cried a lot, and I feared how my illness would affect others and my career. I should have sought support long before I did because no one deserves to bear the weight of a life-threatening illness on their own. In hindsight, I wish I had taken better care of my mental health after my diagnosis. I focused on my physical health since I have a lung disease. Little did I know how important my mental health would be.

My mental health boosted when I pondered my purpose again. I still have one despite having a terminal lung disease. Is it the same as it was before IPF? Absolutely not. However, it is just as meaningful, maybe more.

When faced with adversity or enduring an experience unbeknownst to most, there are two options. One is to wallow in the cards dealt by life. The other is to accept the experience and use the lessons learned to help others or take a stance by sharing the story. The former option is easiest for me, and it’s what I chose during those first few months post-diagnosis. However, once I opened up with my story and accepted that I still had a life to live, not only did my mental health improve but so did my sense of purpose.

I eventually found a way to share what I was facing while helping others — writing my column for Pulmonary Fibrosis News. This aligns with what I always thought to be my purpose. I gain a lot of satisfaction and happiness from the opportunity to serve others through writing. I knew that this disease would eventually make me too tired to continue my beloved career. I also knew that exposing myself to meeting with people for therapy sessions meant risking germ contamination, which is always a concern for anyone with respiratory disease. Despite these risks, the idea of not working in my career field threatened the sense of purpose that I needed.

By writing about IPF as my primary career, I’ve reduced my risk of germ exposure, which will help stabilize my lungs for as long as possible. Most importantly, I can now serve others with IPF through this job. Never in my wildest dreams did I think being diagnosed with IPF could be an opportunity. Sure, I wish more than anything that I didn’t have this lung disease, but the reality is that I do. Framing it as an opportunity helps me cope.

My work as a columnist has restored my life purpose. Although my current purpose is different than I thought it would be, it is no less meaningful than what I previously had. I am so thankful for the connections I have made through this column, and I am grateful to all of you who share this experience with me.

How has your sense of purpose changed since your IPF/PF diagnosis?

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Note: Pulmonary Fibrosis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Pulmonary Fibrosis News or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to pulmonary fibrosis.

Thanks for stopping by my column! My name is Charlene Marshall and I was diagnosed officially with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) on April 7 2016 after 13 months of various tests, hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, such as bronchitis and asthma. Due to my age, the specialist disclosed that he was unsure how the IPF would manifest itself in terms of progression, and whether it would be fast or slow and what the course of my illness might look like. Not much has changed since then, meaning there is still a lot that remains unknown, which is largely due to my age and how “rare” it is for someone under 30 to receive a diagnosis of IPF. That being said, a lot has changed for me in the time since diagnosis and I am looking forward to sharing some of those changes with you through this online platform, and I invite you along for the ride! Throughout this column I intend to chronicle the experience of living with an invisible, yet fatal disease as a young adult and share some stories about how IPF has impacted every aspect of my life, both good and bad, thus far. I plan on highlighting the challenges (and where I can, the positives…) that come with living with IPF and the impact on social and intimate relationships, finances, family dynamics, facing mortality, infertility, travelling, medication side effects, career goals and so much more as it arises for me as a “new” patient. I hope others’ with similar experiences will reach out as no story trumps any other, nor should any go unheard. For now, let me leave you with some personal details about who I am, outside of my IPF diagnosis. I grew up in a small town in south-western Ontario and still live within Ontario, although in a much bigger city. My favorite sport is/was underwater hockey (yes, it is a thing: look it up on YouTube), I love working with people, I work full-time in the Social Work/Social Services field, I am an avid learner filled with heaps of curiosity for the world, which lead me to start my Masters Degree in 2014. I am in the last few months of my Masters Degree and am looking forward to an upcoming trip to Australia more than I’ve looked forward to anything before. Welcome to the shambles and chaos that is my life!
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Thanks for stopping by my column! My name is Charlene Marshall and I was diagnosed officially with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) on April 7 2016 after 13 months of various tests, hospitalizations and misdiagnoses, such as bronchitis and asthma. Due to my age, the specialist disclosed that he was unsure how the IPF would manifest itself in terms of progression, and whether it would be fast or slow and what the course of my illness might look like. Not much has changed since then, meaning there is still a lot that remains unknown, which is largely due to my age and how “rare” it is for someone under 30 to receive a diagnosis of IPF. That being said, a lot has changed for me in the time since diagnosis and I am looking forward to sharing some of those changes with you through this online platform, and I invite you along for the ride! Throughout this column I intend to chronicle the experience of living with an invisible, yet fatal disease as a young adult and share some stories about how IPF has impacted every aspect of my life, both good and bad, thus far. I plan on highlighting the challenges (and where I can, the positives…) that come with living with IPF and the impact on social and intimate relationships, finances, family dynamics, facing mortality, infertility, travelling, medication side effects, career goals and so much more as it arises for me as a “new” patient. I hope others’ with similar experiences will reach out as no story trumps any other, nor should any go unheard. For now, let me leave you with some personal details about who I am, outside of my IPF diagnosis. I grew up in a small town in south-western Ontario and still live within Ontario, although in a much bigger city. My favorite sport is/was underwater hockey (yes, it is a thing: look it up on YouTube), I love working with people, I work full-time in the Social Work/Social Services field, I am an avid learner filled with heaps of curiosity for the world, which lead me to start my Masters Degree in 2014. I am in the last few months of my Masters Degree and am looking forward to an upcoming trip to Australia more than I’ve looked forward to anything before. Welcome to the shambles and chaos that is my life!
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4 comments

  1. Suzanne Brennan says:

    Great column and it will speak to all of us with IPF – even those whose career has ended due to retirement or the disease. There are still life issues where we can be spokespeople for our disease but also for many other areas as well.

    Educate people on what IPF is so they can help advocate for you and others.

    • Charlene Marshall says:

      Hi Suzanne,

      Thanks so much for reading my columns and for getting in touch via the comments. I always appreciate hearing how my columns speak to others with this disease, although sure wish none of us had to deal with IPF. You’re right – opportunities arise in our lives that we otherwise think could never be a positive, which has been my experience with being diagnosed with IPF. I hope my columns help others! Educating others is also very helpful as you say, more people to need to know about this disease to support patients and their families living with it. Thanks again for reaching out!

      Charlene.

  2. JEAN-MICHEL says:

    Dear Charlene … for sure your columns are helping other … I would say : So Much … No doubt about it.
    You always find the right words to express what we are often not able to express ourselves.
    You always find the right words to take care of your readers.
    Thank you so much on behalf of all people who are reading you and do not dare posting
    Jean-Michel

    • Charlene Marshall says:

      Hello my friend!

      It is so lovely to read your kind comments, thank you so much. It is really a privilege to write these columns, as it is very therapeutic for me and I can only hope helpful for others too. Thanks again! I consider myself so lucky to be part of such a special community. Chat with you later in the week, I just sent you a DM back on the forums!

      Hugs,
      Charlene. 🙂

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