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    • #31634
      Patti
      Participant

      Hello, everyone!
      My mom has IPF. She was diagnosed 3 1/2 years ago. She is on 3 liters of oxygen while active and at night. She had an exacerbation a couple of months ago and seems to need her oxygen more often. We are heading to a pulmonologist appointment this week – they may increase her intake again. We currently  rent a liquid oxygen tank and refillable portable, but I’d like to purchase a oxygen concentrator that we can move around the house and plug in.
      Can anyone recommend a reputable company online to purchase from? Or better yet recommend a brand or unit that you like??
      Thanks in advance for any help!!

    • #31643
      Kris manian
      Participant

      Hi Patti,

      if your mom has Medicare the health provider will automatically arrange for one. May be she is not in Medicare I guess. I have a portable pulse oxygen concentrator made by Inogen.. it has 4 hour rechargeable battery,

      I have a bigger noisy one that plugs in to the wall outlet, but has a long tube that is 50’ long, so I can move around the house. The brand is PerfectO2

       

      hope this helps.
      kris

      • #31668
        Patti
        Participant

        Thanks, Kris!
        The type that has to be plugged in is exactly what I need. It’s portable enough to take with her if she spends a night or two away from home. The liquid oxygen tanks are super heavy so you really can’t move them at all.
        She has a small rechargeable portable that she can pull behind her but it acts up sometimes so I don’t depend on it.
        I’ll check out the Perfect O2!

        • #31693
          Phil Ryan
          Participant

          When I first got my non-portable concentrator, I was also bothered by the noise (it was on a wood floor).  Since then I have moved to a carpeted apartment and the noise is not now an issue.  I still hear it, but it’s more “white noise.”  So, as someone previously suggested to me, buy a small carpet to put your concentrator on, and the noise may be more acceptable.

    • #31644
      Kris manian
      Participant

      I forgot to check the notify button☹️

    • #31657
      Doug
      Participant

      I have been happy with the Respironics machines furnished by my Medicare approved O2 provider.  I started with the Simply Go Mini  and the Everflo continuous concentrator for night.  As my disease has progressed I am now on E tanks and the M10600 Continuous flow that goes up to 10lpm continuous.  I guess my next step is the big large tanks; I sure hope is not for a long time.  I would hope you don’t have to buy, but if you do look at the available lpm available as they can vary.  Most our 5 or 6 lpm while a few go even higher.  I wouldn’t consider tanks unless flying and long car trips are no longer and option.

      • #31669
        Patti
        Participant

        Sounds like great advice, Doug! I’ll look into Everflo. She’s at 3lpm now, but I feel like they are going to increase it at her visit this week.
        Thanks for your wisdom! And I wish you the best:)

    • #31659
      James
      Participant

      first, get a prescription as the concentrator is considered a medical device and regulated by our wonderful, compassionate government….. anyway, I have an inogen one g5 i use all day long. I have batteries and wall power.  it is good for 6 ltr hr pulsed. I fly quite a bit and you need one for flying, can’t use tanks.  I had to pay for mine myself to the tune of just about 3100.00   long time battery (10 hours) cost another 400.00… I needed 2 of them.  the cost can add up, most insurances don’t help out.

      • #31670
        Patti
        Participant

        Yes, I know! I was very surprised to find out how much the portables are. And the battery cost hadn’t occurred to me.
        Between IPF and dementia my mom doesn’t get out a lot. I can’t imagine having to travel a lot with a machine to deal with.
        thanks for your advice!!

    • #31661
      Mike Monson
      Participant

      I have a JY-101/JY-101W oxygen concentrator. They’re between 2 and 3 hundred dollars. I really like it and it’s small. Bought it on line.

      The portable inogen machine requires enough breath to trigger the oxygen release so you had better have the doc give you advise before buying it.

      Mike

       

      • #31672
        Patti
        Participant

        I didn’t know that your breath had to be strong enough to trigger the pulse, but that makes sense! I worry about having her machines on pulse – that’s something I’ll definitely start noticing.
        and I’ll definitely look into the JY101s!

        thanks!!

    • #31689
      Doug
      Participant

      The pulse machines do require a certain level of inhaling and exhaling to work.  I don’t think that is much of an issue for most people while awake.  Continuous flow is recommended while sleeping, if necessary, as when asleep breathing may become to shallow for pulse machines to work.  Continuous machines run down batteries much quicker and that is why portables tend to be pulse only.  I’m  on tanks now as portable concentrators are no longer sufficient for me.  The regulator I use on my tanks only has continuous flow.  I’m not sure, but I don’t think any pulse machine goes above 9lpm.

      • #31699
        Patti
        Participant

        Thank you for your input! This makes so much sense to me. And explains why her machine stops pulsing sometimes when she naps in her chair:)

    • #31700
      john styles
      Participant

      As the  disease progresses the need for oxygen increases and so do the effectiveness of the machines available. I have found the pulse machines work fine at night, we still breath when we sleep so the machine detects the breath. As far as noise I have found running a 25 or 50 foot canula putting the machine in a different room with a closed or partially closed door helps with the noise. I have used the innogen and personally found the g4 flawed in that the support strap attaches to the machine and not the case and the g4 columns need replacement more often.  I personally like the g5 as the case is more help against water as it has plastic cover verses a cloth cover like the g3, still need to keep it dry. I have flown and traveled to Europe several times using oxygen concentrators and now just do traveling in USA, I will take a Innogen stand alone for use in hotel rooms to save on batteries. Got a puppy to keep me walking with my oxygen concentrator, Got to keep living until I have problems getting out of the chair. God bless us all for dealing with this terrible disease.

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by john styles.
      • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by john styles.
      • #31760
        Steve Dragoo
        Participant

        @caneelbay1

        Hey John,

        Good incites and traveling with all the equipment we need means we need a porter.  Now if I can just find that pot of gold…

        Stay well,

        Steve

    • #31713
      J
      Participant

      I am looking to purchase a “purse size” concentrator for outside mobility.  They seem to range from $300 – $3000+.   Any suggestions for budget friendly units for < 1000 and reputable places to purchase?  Would need pulse, up to 5-6L, batteries that can be switched out with about 3hrs of run time each, & lightweight under 6lbs.  Already have an ac concentrator at home, but insurance will only provide one.  Refurbished could be an option.  Thanks!

    • #31725

      Hi Patti,
      First of all – liquid oxygen is not available to all patients because it is expensive and reimbursement not as good as gas and/or concentrator. The portable liquid machines can go was high as 15 L/min – albeit it doesn’t last very long. On the flip side there is a smaller liquid unit than the one in your home and even though it’s heavy, it is still doable. Because of the expense of the liquid my husband also had a home concentrator that I believe was approved by Medicare but that was a few years ago so that may have changed.

      As far as POCs (Portable Oxygen Concentrators) go, these machines are VERY misleading! The numbers on the POCs are ONLY settings and NOT L/Min. The majority of them only provide about 1.2-2 L/min of continuous flow. A great source of information can be found at this site https://www.pulmonarypaper.org/summer-2021/. There is a book there that explains it all. I don’t think a POC would be adequate enough for your mom.

    • #31728
      Bob Chiu
      Participant

      Over the years I used several oxygen concentrators. At first I used the Inogen At Home, then the Philips Everflo. Both can go up to 5LPM. Both are relatively quiet. The Inogen gives out a “pop” sound every 5 seconds, but it’s not too loud and I can get used to it. The Everflo gives a continuous level of noise which basically fades into white noise and that one was my favorite.

      As my need for oxygen increases I was prescribed to use a 10LPM machines. My supplier provided me with the Respironics Millennium M10. However it is really loud. I guess as the LPM goes up the noise level goes up exponentially. For a period of time I had to move the unit away from the TV room as it interferes with TV watching even with the volume turned up. Then at night I had to move the unit far away from the bedroom.

      After some complaints and discussions, the technician from the oxygen supplier suggested to hook up my two 5 LPM units with a “Y” connecting tube. The oxygen from the two machines jets out from the short end of the “Y” and the combined oxygen jets out through the long end to the cannula. The end result is that I get my 10 LPM and also a quiet environment.

      • #31731
        Patti
        Participant

        Such excellent advice! Thank you so much

    • #31877
      Paula Gee
      Participant

      I have not flown with a portable oxygen concentrator yet but I was making plans for a trip to Scotland. I have a Caire Freedom Style portable and use a setting of 2. When I talked to United Airlines they told me my machine was not on the approved FAA list even though I told her the machine has an FAA approved label on the bottom of the machine. I have read FAA guidelines and understand they do allow POC and made decision not to continue to upgrade list. What has been your experience with inspection of your machine and paperwork you need when you travel. Thanks so much. Pauls

      • #31920
        Christie Patient
        Moderator

        Hi @paula, there have been lots of discussions on flying with oxygen in the forums that might be helpful to you. Use the search bar at the top right of the page to search keywords “flying”, ” airline”, etc. to see what comes up. 🙂

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