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    • #21841

      The physical impact of changing temperatures is a popular discussion topic among those of us living with chronic lung conditions like idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Sometimes the heat and humidity is bothersome to patients, whereas others are negatively affected by the colder temperatures. Personally, I notice a shift in my ability to breathe when the weather drastically changes – although I tend to adjust, I really notice it at first and often feel very short of breath.

      Unfortunately, the cooler weather has arrived where I live and we saw snow for the first time over the weekend. While it wasn’t a lot, it was enough to remind my body (and lungs!) just how much we don’t like the cold weather.

      I’m always curious as to how the weather affects other IPF patients. This has been a topic of discussion in the past, although we have many new members here and several who are newly diagnosed and/or who have been living with IPF for a long time. As a result, I wanted to gather new “data” or general information about how and what weather triggers IPF-related symptoms.

      As a patient living with this chronic lung disease, does the heat/humidity or frigid cold temperatures bother you more? 

    • #21857
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      It has been raining none stop here for just over a month, not cold yet just chilly at night, I am coughing severely every time I go outside, my breast bone area really hurts when I try to take in a deep breathe.

       

      The heat wave we had earlier was also unbearable but between this damp and the heat wave we had mild dryish weather and I could actually breathe better, walked the dogs further, felt great, then this.

      • #21874

        Hi Susan,

        Thanks for writing and sharing your thoughts on this important topic — raining for a month? That must be awful and feel so very damp on your bones! I would have a hard time with that as well. I wonder if the moisture in the air is contributing to your pain and cough, if the temperatures aren’t too cold yet? Sorry to hear the weather is impacting you both hot and cold, that sure seems unfair!

        I hope it starts cooperating soon. Thinking of you!
        Charlene.

    • #21869
      Joe Murray
      Participant

      Thw heat and humidity of this summer were difficult for me.  I stayed in during the worse hours and days.  Early to mid morning tmand early evening hours were easier on me.  The combination of the two impacted me more than heat alone.   This will be my second winter with IPF so I will see if the cold hits me harder than before.

      • #21870
        Susan Howitt
        Participant

        @jojomojo306

         

        Hi Joe

        My second winter too since diagnosis  of CPFE ++, been on oxygen since this May, so as you say lets see what happens this winter, I do cover my mouth in the severe cold, have a snood that does help stop the cold air hitting the lungs.

         

        Fingers crossed we both come through it no worse off eh?

        • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Charlene Marshall. Reason: tagging
      • #21875

        I will keep my fingers crossed that this winter isn’t too bad for you Joe! Thanks for writing and sharing your experience with us. Sometimes I am conflicted when I think about hot or cold weather, and in the moment I think the heat is usually worse but the cold causes pain in my chest with the cough, so then I think that is worse. Truth is, both hot and cold bother me as well.

        Hang in there.
        Charlene.

    • #21871
      Rene Hakkenberg
      Participant

      Living in the Caribbean island of Bonaire and diagnosed with IPF late 2017 (although undiagnosed 2014 CT scans indicate scarring in the lungs) I definitely find an important negative  impact on my breathing and shortness of breath when the weather is hot and humid.  Or when we are suffering from ‘Sahara Dust’ (no joke), yes, extremely fine dust that finds its way from the Sahara desert to the Caribbean. Because we are a small island surrounded by ocean and blessed by trade winds, we do not have the extreme temperatures differences that many of you have in the US or Canada. However during October to December we have our highest temperatures and no or little wind, and my shortness is much worse. I try to stay in air conditioning as much as possible.

    • #21877

      Hi Rene,

      So nice to hear from you, thanks for writing – though I am sad to hear that shortness of breath you were experiencing hasn’t resolved at all yet. You’re in a unique position being in the middle of the ocean in Bonaire, but yes I can only imagine how irritating the Sahara Dust would be on your breathing! Will it continue throughout October to December if it is high heat/humidity now? I hope not. Thinking of you often.

      Charlene.

    • #21895
      Laura Bush
      Participant

      Hi! The cold damp air definitely makes my symptoms worse. I’ve been feeling awful for about 3 weeks, low grade temp, incessant cough, and chest pain. I went to the doctor last week and had a chest x-ray. As I suspected it is pneumonia. He prescribed Levaquin but I  haven’t had any improvement yet so I suspect it may be viral. I am not looking forward to these winter months as I fear that I will be sick the entire season.

      Laura

       

      • #21898
        Mark Koziol
        Keymaster

        Hello Laura, sorry to hear you are not feeling well. I have also been fighting a cold for several weeks. It is no fun and mine is just a cold. Try to keep up on your water intake and  if you have an incentive spirometer please use it. If you don’t have one I would suggest getting one either from your physician or a store. It’s rough doing this exercise but I feel will help you get better and exercise those lungs. Take care, Mark.

    • #21905
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Mark

      I have just ordered a three ball lung trainer, as we have had none stop rain, one month and counting !!,  I am not getting in the walking I am used to doing, found out my saturations start to go down almost immediately I start walking even on 5lts, so trying to do something about it.  I will let you know if it seems to work but have to wait a while for International postage.

    • #22184
      Nan
      Participant

      Hello everyone, I have been using the extreme cold type breathing as an explanation as to how my lungs feel. Let me explain. I say to my friends and family “you know how it feels when you take a deep breath in the extreme cold? that burning feeling? well that is how I feel with every deep breath i take”. This seems to really help them to understand. Is that how others feel about breathing? My cough is much worse when damp out. I have been having more SOB lately and my PT told me to get a spirometer, the three balls breathing thing. I got it yesterday. Am i supposed to get all three balls up? i can’t, in order to get 2 up i do a lot of cough, 1 is no big deal :).

    • #22185
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Nan

       

      Yep that is a good explanation of how every breath feels  Been raining almost none stop here for over a month, wettest November on record and it has REALLY affected me, cough every time I change temperatures, I wear a snood when out to try and equalize the warm air going into my lungs.

      I have one of those spirometers, can suck in enough to get two balls up but as for holding any of them up, out of the question so far, now if it was blowing out, with my diseases that would be a piece of cake for all three I think and holding them up there.  lol. Have good spirometer tests at the hospital, all blowing out or holding my breathe,  but am on oxygen 24/7.

    • #22186

      Hi Nan,

      So nice to hear from you and thanks for sharing how you describe what IPF feels like to those around you. This is something I regularly struggle with – how do you describe pain and breathlessness?

      Using the comparison to taking a deep breath if frigid cold weather is a good idea. The dampness (especially of today where we are) is quite bothersome to me, and I am finding myself exhausted as well. Hope you’re managing ok!

      Re: the spirometer. I’m surprised the PT asked you to get this without setting you up with a protocol in terms of how often you should do this excerise, the intensity / settings, etc to maximize its use. Can you connect back with the PT and ask these questions? Doing so will ensure you’re optimizing the spirometer, hopefully not worsening your SOB or cough. Take care and hope these side effects subside.

      Charlene.

    • #22187
      Nan
      Participant

      Hi Susan, I have been thinking of you wondering how you are doing, i can’t hold the balls up either.

      Charlene, i am a bad patient, she told me to get one and bring it to her, i am not to be using it before meeting with her on Wednesday but i have been “playing with it”. Good call, i will stop and not use it until she reviews it with me. SHe always tells me not to do anything that increases my SOB or cough. She does have me doing belly breathing with pursed lips, sometimes that makes me cough so i try not to be to aggressive, does that make sense? BTW do you know qualifiers for O2 in Ontario?

    • #22192
      Malcolm Mann
      Participant

      Hi everyone
      We have a different problem, eastern Australia is in severe drought, with high temperatures. We are experiencing the worst period of bush fires in my life. There is a massive fire just north of here and we have had continual smoke for the last two weeks, as has most of the east coast.
      In Sydney yesterday visability was down to 100metres. What we need most is some of Susans rain.
      The smoke really effects my breathing and increases the fatigue level, I drove the 100 miles home from Canberra last week and slept for the rest of the day.
      Cheers
      Mal

    • #22201
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      PLEASE Malcolm swap my rain for just a bit of your sunshine, can’t cope with heat nor smoke though so you can keep most of that   lol.  Sounds horrendous, my brother is out there too in the Victoria area so not as bad.

    • #22202
      jaime L manriquez
      Participant

      hello Charleen

      I Think I comment before about the weather afecting us, But in my case being a Canadian living abroad, in a quite mild and humid weather , compared with the cold of Calgary, here I feel much better  the season are marked very well, summers go maximun 25c a few days,    and  lots of rain throughout the year. I was diagnosed IPF back at end 2012.

      best regards

    • #22203
      jaime L manriquez
      Participant

      Hello Charlene

      I think I ve  commented before about this topic, but in my case , I´m a Canadian living abroad

      Here the weather is quite mild and damp, in summer time we have around 25 c. for a few days, the rest of the year  goes from  2 to 20c  in fall and winter with lots of rain throughout the year, compared with the cold of Calgary , its much better here, cold was not to good for me..I was diagnosed IPF by the end of 2012, Im 71 years old.

    • #22204

      Hi Nan,

      Thanks for getting back to me and hope you’re now coping okay with the extreme cold and wind we’re getting. What a roller coaster ride of weather, especially compared to Monday when it was so rainy. Rapid changes in weather tends to bother my breathing so I hope you’re managing okay.

      Good idea to keep the device and refrain from using it until she can assess your abilities and set you up with the proper instructions on using the spirometer. I know it can be tempting to see what we’re capable of doing but you definitely don’t want to trigger or exacerbate anything 🙂

      As for qualifiers in Ontario – my experience was based on a 6MWT and my saturations during that walk test. Once I had a test which dropped my saturations under 88% I was prescribed oxygen, only for nighttime uses at first but since then I’ve become more in need of it. Have you had a 6-minute-walk-test yet?

      Char.

    • #22208

      Hi Mal,

      I’m so sorry to hear of the bushfires in Australia – I can only imagine how the air qualify would effect your breathing and fatigue. My heart went out to those in California last year (and this year!) who lost so much from the fires, and I can only imagine how hard all the fires in Australia are for those with lung diseases right now. I’ve been to Sydney and can’t imagine only having a visibility of 100meters – wow! I stood at the top of the harbour bridge and felt like I could see for miles. I hope they are able to get the smoke and fires under control, and please take care of yourself and your lungs during this time.

      Do you have a humidifier to try and help purify the air? Take good care and please let us know how you’re doing!
      Charlene.

    • #22209
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Nan

       

      Hi Nan

      What I did was do a chart, wrote down every single little thing for three days, ie showering & getting dressed, down to 86% blood oxygen (bought myself a oxymeter first)  going up stairs 80,, feeding dogs 86,  going down the garden to pick up dog poop, 80, getting in shopping from car 78, getting into bed 77  etc etc.  took this chart to doc, they sent me to hospital oops. wasput on oxygen for 16 hours a day, last May, now in December am on oxygen 24/7 BUT on good days, ie  sunny, cool and dry I can walk three kilometres, on the flat, can’t do the slightest hill even with oxygen,  with only three stops to get my sats up. with a back pack oxygen recuperateur (can’t think of the English) 5 ltpm, that is the max for the machine.  Sitting down I don’t really need any oxygen as my sats are 97% !!! don’t understand that at all.   Maybe a chart might help you.

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by Susan Howitt.
    • #22220
      Malcolm Mann
      Participant

      Hi Charlene & Susan
      Thanks for the kind words, we actually had a little rain, (6mm) which I hope is a start. Susan we’ll take all the rain we can get, the air here is beautiful today, cool and damp, perfect breathing air.

      I’m still having difficulty posting responses, just the odd one gets through, usually the short ones. I shall persist.
      Cheers
      Mal

    • #22222
      Nan
      Participant
      1. Mal, so good to hear the weather is better. I have no idea what that smoke would be like, sounds dreadful. We are cold and damp here. One thing about the cold is I automatically want to walk faster but then I get short of breath, mouth breath, dry out and cough more. I do use a scarf, it helps. Met with my PT and she was not to happy that I tried spirometer on my own oops. Thank you Charlene. She is working with me on it and did a ton of teaching. I have never done a six minute walk test. I have only had oximeter on while sitting quietly and then it is in the high 90s. Susan I am hoping and praying for good breathing weather for you.
    • #22223
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Having same problems as Malcolm, not able to post since yesterday bar short posts

    • #22234

      Malcom and Susan,

      Hi @mal-com, and @reglois

      Thanks for sticking with us through the technology difficulties. I’ve just asked our tech team to ensure both of your usernames are on our “white list” which means your content should be held, or posted without any errors. If you keep having troubles please do let me know. I’ll do my best to get us all through the technological mishaps – especially because we value your contributions as important members of our community.

      Take care,
      Charlene.

    • #22235

      Hi Nan,

       

      Thanks for your note – nicer weather today here, huh? I’m glad your PT is helping you use the spirometer and establish breathing techniques that will hopefully help! I think it would be wise – keeping in mind, I am not a medical professional – to have a 6 minute walk test done for you. Your oxygen is going to be optimal during rest/sitting periods, these likely won’t allow you to get an accurate reading/understanding of your needs during exertion or movement. Can you ask your PT about getting this set up, or your doctor? If your sats are in the 90s during sitting that’s great, but do they drop lower when moving about? If so, this may be an indicator of needing oxygen (while I can understand not wanting this!), especially if the saturation’s drop below a certain point. Keep me posted!
      Charlene.

       

       

    • #22252
      Nan
      Participant

      Hi Charlene

      I was thinking that when I go to the ILD clinic in Toronto next month they would do a six minute walk test???? Should i buy an oximeter on amazon and do as Susan did charting sats with different activities? Yesterday i really “over did it”. I know you have talked about this before, my family does not get that i get tired/fatigued easily. I babysat my grandson overnight, he is 8.5 months old, it was too much for me. Yesterday i was so exhausted. At bed time I got so SOB I was scared. I have had these “spells” before and each one is so scary. I was thinking of calling 911 but my husband propped me up on pillows ( one is feather, i will throw that away today) put a fan on and talked me through it. Today I am coughing a lot and just wore out. I am trying to stay positive but I feel so useless sometimes and that is why I over do things and pay the price. i do wonder if i need oxygen, at least at times. I can go for good walks and do things around the house as long as i go slow, putter and rest. I am nervous about Christmas.

    • #22253
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Nan

      The minimum they (should) put on script for oxygen is 16 hours, research has showed it is not effective at lower hours. I can sleep without so use the 16 hours for the days, have a back pack so can walk my dogs, only on the flat now, for 3kms. If you are not a hypochondriac, get an oximeter, I only checked for the first few days whilst I wrote the chart and when ever I feel out of puff, rest until my sats come up, takes a minute or two only.   To really check my sats the hospital did three deep vein tests in my wrist, not that comfortable but for more reliable than the oximeter which is only a good guide.  Best of luck for next month.  So right to get rid of feather pillow !!.

      Thanks for the white list Charlene, all working perfectly now

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Susan Howitt.
    • #22273
      Nan
      Participant

      Thanks Susan. I am not a hypochondriac so I ordered an oximeter from Amazon. Will be here Thursday. I have a had a tough couple of days, curious to see what my saturations are doing.

    • #22274
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hope you find it helpful, I do, as I have learned to recognise before my sats  get too low,  stop, breathe (I am on 5ltspm O2) and within a few minutes I can continue with my exercise. With this device I have so far upped my walking capacity by a kilometre, not a lot I know but I hope to be able to do more.  Good luck

    • #22298
      Nan
      Participant

      HI Susan and Charlene,

      I got my sat monitor yesterday.  i have been testing it since, a bit obsessively. It was not an expensive unit and it is really picky about movement so hard to get accurate readings with activity which is what i really want to know so i have played around. Results are at rest 94-95% occasionally higher. It actually goes up when i cough which is weird. With normal activity it is 90-94, light activity it is good like 95-97. With strenuous activity it drops to 88%, walking fast(er) low 80s on a slight grade it went to 79 twice. I seem to recover fast. I guess i compensate good. I can usually tell if it is low, occasionally I am surprised. Any suggestions?

    • #22301
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      With most non medical oximeters you need to stand still for the few seconds it takes to read. My resting sats are 97% just like a *normal* person !!! I recover pretty fast too, i.e less than 30 seconds usually, but I have to wait until the dizziness stops, even from a real low, once 46, fell over with that one, tried to get the shopping in without oxygen. On a walk with my dogs, I do 3 kms and now know when to stop and check (now down to three times) and rarely go down below 84 now, I cannot do any gradient even on O2.  I never wear the oximeter continuously as you get a false reading that way I have found.  Take note of what you feel, stop test, get sats back up, continue and check before you start to feel too bad, the idea is to take a breather before you go too low, I am trying to get my lungs fitter, walking on the flat,  at a medium pace, used to be a fast walker, and I seem to be able to go longer before  dropping to low 80s on 5ltrspm oxygen.  Got myself a pedimeter too, I am amazed at how much I do actually walk, only have it on my coat so take outdoor readings and most days I register about 5kms. chuffed thought I did much less. Might take  inside movement before next pulmonary visit, professor said I didn’t do enough !!!

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Susan Howitt.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by Susan Howitt.
    • #22307
      Nan
      Participant

      I am still not great at these forums lol i answered you Susan under the feather pillows and duvets thread. I got mixed up haha.

      Charlene you talk about fog brain, i have been getting that sometimes lately too, not to fun.

       

    • #22308
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Nan

       

      Levels below 88% are not normal, so do a chart for your pulmonologist.  I also headed the chart with what the weather was like of that particular day, ie, hot, raining so damp and humid, cool and dry etc. did the same sort of chart for each weather type.  I did, showering and dressing, going up stairs, walking up an incline, walking dogs, picking up after dogs,  ( I struggle to bend) funnily enough the very worst was getting into bed, I would drop to as low as 74 some times, no idea why that should be for such a simple task, sitting and digesting food was a surprise too.

      Brain fogs, you would be surprised at where I find I have put things on occasions.   Hope your cold stays at just tickly throat stage.

    • #22310

      Hi Nan,

      Glad you received it – sounds like you’re doing all the right things in terms of tracking. I agree, it can feel a bit obsessive but testing your sats at different activity levels and noting the environmental aspects of those drops/increases (as Susan said) gives you a good baseline. It will be helpful to bring to Toronto in your January appointment if you track them, and have the “data” to show trends, or what bothers you most. This might help your physician determine your oxygen needs, and what types of things to avoid and/or will help reduce your SOB.

      It should always be above 88 (ideally 90) so those low 80s numbers and 79 are really concerning. Make sure those are noted, because those numbers means your other organs are being deprived of oxygen. Recovering fast is usually a good sign, so note that as well when you can. I know this is asking alot, but the more information you can bring your January appointment, the better – in my experience anyways.

      Have a great Christmas. We still need to go for coffee! Maybe in the new year?

      Charlene.

    • #22311

      Hi Nan,

      Sorry – I am a bit behind on replying, and see you did purchase an oximeter on Amazon which is great. Definitely start charting activity, as mentioned below by Susan and I. This will be very helpful for the ILD clinic in Toronto. I would imagine they will do the 6 MWT for you, though the first visit may be more of a consult to see if you “qualify” (not the right word, but the only one coming to me at the moment) for following there by physicians. It may not include a number of tests, though I don’t know. My experience has differed from others’ when it comes to the first time transplant centre meeting.

      Hang in there this week – Christmas can be so chaotic! Don’t forget to voice what you need, and stand up for how you’re feeling. Others often don’t understand and that is difficult to navigate but ultimately, we’re the ones who pay the price physically if we overdo it. It’s important to find some balance 🙂

      Take care,
      Char.

       

       

    • #22315
      Nan
      Participant

      Thank you for the great advice. I have been monitoring my sats for 5 days now, I was thinking for doing it for a week. I am surprised by some of the low lows however I now know it is not all “in my head” :).

      Merry Christmas, happy holidays to everyone!

      P.S. Charlene, yes lets have coffee in the new year!

    • #22317
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Nan

       

      Hope the docs take notice of your charts, mine did and wanted me hospitalised that day !!

      Left hospital a week late on O2, must say I was very very disappointed to find that even on 5ltspm I still couldn’t go up an incline and still felt breathless all the time, is it me, or is this normal, don’t know.  Took reading on my daily dog walk today, within a minute I was down to 88% and after 1/4 of an hour 74%, stopped got back up to 94%  started to walk again and back down to 75% after 10 minutes.  Thought I was getting fitter as I feel able to easily do the 3 to 4 kms, 4 on a nice rain free sunny day like today. Resigned myself that I will have to stop before I feel so breathless and giddy and just wait, ignoring the looks from the dogs  lol, until my sats get right back up, shall inquire at my next pulmonologists meeting as to why this happens, and if he says I don’t exercise  enough again I think I might sock him.

      Merry Christmas every one and a Happy New Year

    • #22336

      Sounds great Nan, we can connect in the new year! Maybe after your appointment at TGH? Tis an awful season for germs/viruses going around, I can’t believe so many people around me are so sick. Stay healthy and look forward to meeting up with you for coffee soon.
      Char.

    • #22346
      Nan
      Participant

      Yes Charlene I look forward to it too. I may plague you with questions ;). My appointment is Jan 29 so just 4 more weeks.

      Seems like I am like you Susan in that my sats go up and down and all over. Today I was eating and it went to 80% (good wave good reading on HR so accurate) I stopped and it went to 94. Most of my at rests are 93-95 but sometimes more. Today, other than when eating it has been quite good. I went for a short walk in the hallway of my building and it only dropped to 92% and I was not as SOB as normal for me. It was a flat easy surface I guess. I have not been as SOB today but I am coughing more and very very tired. IS this normal? I can tell when my O2 is down because I mouth breath, huff and puff and feel “off”. I am learning to take it a good pace and conserve energy (yet I am so tired). Is there such a thing as oxygen when needed? So now I am worried that when I go to the doc I will be having a “good day” and be sent on my way. This has happened to me before. I am having PFTs at my appointment but that is all I know at this time. Sorry for rambling I hope everyone can understand my questions lol.

    • #22371

      Hi Nan,

      That is no problem – I’m happy to answer questions as best I can! I’ve been plagued pretty bad with serious illnesses since early November and now have a bit of a cold and am congested/coughing. Having a weak immune system sucks. Hope you had a nice new years?

      Yes, it is possible to use oxygen only “as needed/PRN”. When I was first prescribed it – I didn’t have to fight for it, so I hope you don’t either – my script was to use as needed and on exertion. Of course they still give you the different litre flows to use for both scenarios. I’m glad you’re tracking your activity, 02 sats, how you feel etc to bring with you to Toronto because even if you are having a good day, this should give the physician some data which is important. Hang in there and I’m looking forward to hearing how your appointment goes.

      Warm regards,
      Charlene.

    • #22379
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Charlene    I was recommended to take (by a pharmacist) Echinacea drops, an immunity booster, they taste absolutely foul, but I must say they seem to be working, been on them for three months now and been in direct contact several times with the nasty chest virus that is around and also coughs and colds and touch wood, so far I haven’t caught even the slightest sniffle.

    • #22384

      Hi Susan,

      Thanks for sharing – yes, I’ve heard that Echinacea drops can do wonders for our immune system. I should start taking this as well, mine has taken a significant hit the last few weeks. Glad they seem to be working for you — stay healthy!
      Char.

    • #22387
      Nan
      Participant

      Charlene, so sorry to hear you are not feeling well. Please take good care of yourself.

      Update on me, I never did get a cold, my sore throat cleared, so far so good, knock on wood. My good day was just that, a day. My sats have been quite low. Rest 92-95, slightest exertion it drops. New Year’s eve we went to friends house for dinner. A nice quiet time. The wife is a palliative home care nurse. When I was getting my coat and boots on I was huffing and puffing and she could not believe how SOB I was. She got out her machine and my sat was 84% and my HR 128. She was worried and told me I need to take it easy until i get oxygen. This scarred me more than anything as as long as it was me checking i could remain in denial. Now I can not. I have contacted my union rep today and letting my employer know i need to be on modified until at least assessed in Toronto. I cried a bit. They have been good so far letting me work mostly from home but now I need to work exclusively at home and not do home visits. I really need to look after me.

      Happy new year

      Nan

    • #22389
      Nan
      Participant

      Oh my goodness, i just watched the news and saw how bad the fires are in Australia. Malcolm I hope you are safe. It looks so bad for everyone but especially those with lung disease. Here is it mild, cloudy and dampish, not to bad for breathing. I coughed a lot outside but that is normal for me. I can’t imagine air filled with smoke. Do take care!

    • #22395
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Sorry to hear that you have been under the weather Charlene, please do take the drops, they are foul though, really foul but needs must

      Sorry that you have had someone else tell you, you need oxygen Nan, must have been distressing but when you need it you need it, the need is to protect your other organs, it wont necessarily (suppose it depends on your disease) help with your SOB, it doesn’t help me as much as I hoped/thought it would.

      Yes poor Malcolm, can’t imagine how bad that can be, my brother is also out there, he is not affected by the fires this time but I nearly lost him in the fires some 11 or so years ago.

    • #22399
      Malcolm Mann
      Participant

      Hi Nan and Susan
      We survived NY eves fires, the front came within 100m of our home, we and the town were saved by a massive wind shift at exactly the right moment, that blew the fire back on itself. Other villages didnt do so well with the southerly blowing the flank of the fire across the towns.All in all a horendous day, 40degrees c (105)f, down to 50m visability and smoke.
      We woke up new years day and decided to get out, I couldnt breath.
      The power, telephones, tv, radio, internet the national radio &tv broadcaster all burnt out and not working. Fuel being rationed, thousands of holiday tourists stranded, supermarket shelves empty.
      Jan &I drove the 300kms to Sydney and because of the traffic and blocked roads it took us 12 hrs over two days, we stayed with friends last night and with my sister for the next few nights.the country where the fires have burnt is totally devestated, massive eucalypts smashed knocked over and still burning. The fires are to big and inaccessable to be put out, what we need is 6ins of rain, and thats the only thing that will stop the destruction. No rain is forecast.
      Another really hot day is forecast for tomorrow.
      Things are ok in Sydney, only low 30s, air pretty clear, and the beach not too far, my breathing is a lot better.
      Cheers
      Mal

    • #22400
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      So pleased you got out Malcolm, do hope that your lungs recover, can’t imagine how you suffered.  Hope when you can go back home that everything is OK. My brother is in the Victoria area and the fires, years ago, came within 100m of his house, too, I heard afterwards and he didn’t care, he had just lost his wife to cancer,  the phones went out, several days of sheer panic and grief, BUT he had the heart to go and help another widow and so saved her and himself. They have since become an item so in a way the fires did him good.  Rain stopped here  over Europe so maybe you will get a miracle  Amazing how the temperatures can vary over there Victoria has had record high temps, I think David said one day was over 45°

      Stay safe

    • #22401
      Mark Koziol
      Keymaster

      Hello Malcolm, I am happy you got out safely. What a horrific experience to go through. Prayers are with you and your family, and everyone who has to experience this disaster. Take care and breath easy. Mark

      • This reply was modified 3 weeks, 1 day ago by Mark Koziol.
    • #22407

      Hi Nan,

      Thanks for writing – I continue to slowly get better, but this has taken a lot out of me. One day at a time when it comes to recovering from an illness with IPF.

      Glad your symptoms didn’t manifest into a full blown cold. I’ll keep my fingers crossed that this continues for you! I wouldn’t be surprised in the least if the doctor’s prescribed oxygen for you in Toronto, given those numbers. In the low 80s can be quite dangerous for your heart, I’m glad you’re tracking all of this. You’re absolutely right about taking care of you — as hard as that is. I have yet to make the full step of resigning (or even going down to part-time hours, though I’m off right now due to being so sick) but know that isn’t far off. I’m really glad your workplace has been accommodating. That is great to hear!

      Take care of yourself and keep us posted on how you’re doing, especially how the TGH appointment goes!
      Char.

    • #22408

      Thanks so much Susan – I just ordered them on Amazon. Fingers crossed the help me stay healthy throughout the rest of this horrid cold and flu season. Take care! Char.

    • #22409

      @mal-com

      Hi Malcolm,

      Thanks so much for writing and letting us know you’re okay – I’ve been thinking of you! What a horrendous ordeal you must have experienced with the fires, I just can’t imagine. I’ve seen pictures of the “blood red sky” and it just makes my skin crawl with fear, then thinking of all those struggling due to health conditions (like IPF and being unable to breathe in the smoke) and the poor animals too, makes my heart cry. I’m so sorry this is happening to your beautiful country. I love Australia, spent lots of time there and I feel impacted by the fires so I can’t imagine how all of you feel.

      Glad you took the steps to protect your lungs and to get to cleaner air! We’ll continue praying for Australia and hope the fires burn out soon. Thinking of you during this tough time – stay safe!
      Char.

    • #22410
      Susan Howitt
      Participant

      Hi Charlene

      Hope you are continuing to recover.  The nasty virus tried to get me over the last couple of days,  had the start of it, sore throat, hot and cold shivers, achy limbs, headache etc but doubled my dose of steroids and religiously took the Echinacea drops and today I feel fine,  every one else that has had it has been in bed, gee I am healthier than I thought lol.  so steroids, Echinacea, don’t care which one helped, maybe a combination but I am grateful that something helped.

      I really do hope the drops can help you.

    • #22411
      Nan
      Participant

      I should have taken that advice too, my “feeling like I am coming down with something” did eventually turn into a full blown cold. So far, with the help of tylenol cold I am doing ok. I hoe you guys return to better health very soon. <i am just resting and watching team Canada in the world juniors gold medal hockey game. I feel fine as long as I am at rest. Get the rest you need, that is very important.

      Mal, so glad you are in a safe place, where you can breathe now. You are in my thoughts and prayers. Please take care and keep us posted.

    • #22423

      Thanks so much Susan! I hope they will help as I continue to battle “cold-like” symptoms, though I’ll take them over the infections I’ve had over the last few weeks. It’s been tough. I’ll let you know how I make out with them. Hope you feel better too! 🙂

      • #22426
        Susan Howitt
        Participant

        Best of luck Charlene hope your symptoms don’t get worse, mine did a bit though not as bad as they could have been, terrible cough has stopped me sleeping the last couple of days, can’t lie down, checked with doctor, nothing in my lungs, so that is good, she gave me antibiotics to hopefully catch any secondary infections even though what I have is a virus.

        Unfortunately I have to go out today in the damp and fog to do a bank transfer to my daughter in Wales, her car has been wrecked by a huge hole opening up in the ground, she has found a bargain with not many miles from a reputable garage (where she bought her last one) so present from Mum !!!!

    • #22424

      Hope you feel better soon Nan!
      Quite the game yesterday wasn’t it? Proud of our Canadian players!
      Take care, Char.

    • #22427
      jaime L manriquez
      Participant

      @reglois

      hello Susan,  about your cough and sleepless nites, I suffered the same, time ago, now I take a Dr, prescirption…FLEMEX with codeine syrup at bedtime (a tablespoon) , I sleep well through the nite, hope it work for you, best regards

      Jaime

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 4 days ago by Mark Koziol.
      • This reply was modified 2 weeks, 4 days ago by Charlene Marshall. Reason: tagging
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